Hong Kong Architecture

Hong Kong gets the world’s major number of skyscrapers, with 317 towers taller than 150 metres (490 ft), and the third-largest number of high-rise buildings on earth. Having less available space restricted development to high-density residential tenements and commercial complexes packed closely together on buildable land. Single-family detached homes are actually rare, and generally only within outlying areas. In the event you wish to know about data hongkong 2020 you can visit our website.

Hong Kong Architecture

The International Commerce Centre and Two International Finance Centre could be the tallest buildings in Hong Kong and among the tallest in the Asia-Pacific region. Other distinctive buildings lining the Hong Kong Island skyline will be the HSBC Main Building, the anemometer-topped triangular Central Plaza, the circular Hopewell Centre, and the sharp-edged Bank of China Tower.

Demand for new construction has contributed to frequent demolition of older buildings, freeing space for modern high-rises. However, many types of European and Lingnan architecture remain found through the complete territory. Older government buildings are types of colonial architecture. The 1846 Flagstaff House, the former residence of the commanding British military officer, may be the oldest Western-style building in Hong Kong. Some (like the Court of Final Appeal Building and the Hong Kong Observatory) retain their original function, and others have been adapted and reused; the Former Marine Police Headquarters was redeveloped right into a commercial and retail complex, and Béthanie (built in 1875 as a sanatorium) houses the Hong Kong Academy for Performing Arts. The Tin Hau Temple, focused on the sea goddess Mazu (originally built-in 1012 and rebuilt in 1266), may be the territory’s oldest existing structure. The Ping Shan Heritage Trail has architectural types of several imperial Chinese dynasties, just like the Tsui Sing Lau Pagoda (Hong Kong’s only remaining pagoda).

Tong lau, mixed-use tenement buildings constructed through the colonial era, blended southern Chinese architectural styles with European influences. These were especially prolific through the immediate post-war period, when many were rapidly built to house many Chinese migrants. For example Lui Seng Chun, the Blue House in Wan Chai, and the Shanghai Street shophouses in Mong Kok. Mass-produced public-housing estates, built because the 1960s, are mainly constructed in modernist style.